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April 21
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Light matters.

Mon Apr 21, 2014, 10:50 AM
I think every photographer has heard the expression "Shot to death", of course that does not mean killing someone, it just means that an area has been photographed so much and from so many angles that it can feel pointless to shoot it yourself.

Couple of examples that comes to mind, The Eifel tower, The horseshoe bend are two places that has been "shot to death", personally I would say it is far from it.
Having seen many images from both those locations suddenly there comes a new image that makes you go both "wow" and "aha".

Here is an example of a really tiny area where I live, there is nothing much too this place, but I have shot pretty much every nook and cranny of this place, but I still revisit this place from time to time and shoot a few shots, last time being about 19 hours ago at the writing of this journal. :)

Shot to death ?
Neset by Trichardsen

I think it was the well known landscape photographer that said that he waits for the light, then start shooting, i.e light comes first.
I would have to agree with him for most cases, obvious exception where you do not have to wait for any light is in the studio, it might take some time to set up, but it is always available.

If you look at the example above there is an overview shot of the place done under pretty boring lighting conditons, the dramatic change of any location comes with light, from mid day to sunset is such a big difference that many that hire landscape photographers does not accept any shots that has been done mid-day, only sunrise and sunset.

And mix in the nightsky and a place takes on a whole different quality, it is basicly all about light.


I would put it to the point that a place that is shot to death provides you with an advantage of a place that is not, you will have a great overview of the location, you have seen it from many different angles, it can give you an idea to a shot that is never before done and you can take it up to a new level.



But what do you do on those days where you are not getting the light you where hoping for, a very good example is cloudy days with flat light, it is perfect for portrait shots almost all the portrait shots I have done including two weddins have been done outside in flat lighting.

What about mid-day and harsh lighting condition ?
Here I would bring a diffuser/reflector and maybe even a flash for any kind of portrait shots, but for macro work it would be perfect to get that strong light from the sun so I could stop way down and get the depth of field needed.


In the end there is no wrong kind of light, just different qualities and challenges associated with it, and if I was to throw out a challenge to anyone reading this it would be this:

Try revisiting that one place you have become bored with and do a great shot focusing on the quality of light. :)


Have a nice day. :boogie: :dance:

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:iconadriandunk:
AdrianDunk Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
I always enjoy you journals as a keen amateur photographer myself I am always on the lookout for new ideas and info so I can improve my own standard. It is just not landscapes that have been shot to death you can include any photography subject. Been a keen wildlife photographer I am always trying to capture a bird/animal doing something and like you say you dont won't perfect light all the time, the challenge is to get them in all sorts of light and we must also remember that we don't have to take colour photo's we can shoot in black and white as well. That to me is what makes photography such a enjoyable hobby each shot is a challenge when you blaze away at a subject to me that is not photography. I also like to do sunrises and sunsets you get that golden hour of light that just makes everything look so different to me no two sunrises/ sunsets are the same there are many factors to take into consideration before even taking the picture. I could say many more things but I don't want to take up too much off your time you have been helpful to me in the past which is very much appreciated and thank you for such a enjoyable read.
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:icontrichardsen:
Trichardsen Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014  Professional Photographer
Thank you. :)

Well for black and white the quality of light matters just as much, but b&w is favourable when it is a greater variation of light and good dynamic range in a scene which often create very dramatic scenes.
To cool thing about bird photography is that you can change the angle by just a tiny bit and you get a completely different image, just how you work with background plays a huge part in the shot, its in a way kinda like macro photography. :)
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:iconforsakenoutlaw:
ForsakenOutlaw Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Good journal post indeed!  You're right, places "shot to death" have the distinct advantages that you point out and we all know, no two light conditions will ever be the same, even from the same location at identical times of the day.  Your example there shows it perfectly, that could be 11 different places rather than one locality.  Good point on light comes first, that's right, light is indeed everything.  It'll make or break you shot.  Now for me, and I've gotten looks before, flat, cloudy days, the days perfect for portraits, I find myself displeased with every shot?  Those harsh, bright days, I love every shot.  I love colors that pop and I'll do portrait shots in harsh, bright light because of this reason.  I know I'm going against the curve on this one but I find myself that cloudy days lend only to B&W photography for me versus full-on color.
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:icontrichardsen:
Trichardsen Featured By Owner Apr 22, 2014  Professional Photographer
Thank you. :)

It is about how you take advantage of the light in the end.
On flat days you have to take advantage of foreground background, especially when playing with bokeh, it is that more important then, in harsh sunlight you are certainly going to get more pop to the images, and if you can work with a diffuser and/or flash then it is a better option, but for straight up natural light portrait I prefer the flatter light.

I tend to favour b&w if the weather is bad, if it is really bad then it is even better for b&w. :)
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:iconrogersphotos:
RogersPhotos Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014  Student Photographer
Hire nature photographers? That happens?

I'm never going to make a dime on nature photography.
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:icontrichardsen:
Trichardsen Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014  Professional Photographer
Oh that happens, but it is generally at a exceptionally high level, like National Geographic and such. :)
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:iconmypeanutgallery:
MYPeanutGallery Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014
Interesting, as usual. Light makes all the difference in how a photo comes out. Most of my photos are in my own backyard. Bright morning light washes out the white feathers on the birds and the faces of chippies and squirrels. The best light comes in the late afternoon and early evening, just as the shadows are appearing. I think that is what you call flat light. No glare, just true colors and clarity.
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:icontrichardsen:
Trichardsen Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014  Professional Photographer
Yes it certainly does.

By flat lightning I mean where highlights and shadows makes no difference, usualy when it is cloudy, and especially flat lightning happens when it is cloudy and foggy.
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:iconmypeanutgallery:
MYPeanutGallery Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014
Oh, I see what you mean. Thanks for explaining it further. :D
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:icontrichardsen:
Trichardsen Featured By Owner Apr 21, 2014  Professional Photographer
:D
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